The Mets Pick Michael Conforto: A Look Back at Ten Other Number Ten Picks

Michael ConfortoYesterday was the 2014 MLB player draft, and the Mets, we all know by now, picked Michael Conforto with their pick, the tenth in the draft. When it comes to amateur players I am a total amatuer, I do not know who any of these guys are. A lot of other blogs work hard at this stuff, personally I enjoy Mack’s Mets who are outworked by no one. I’m sure they will have excellent comprehensive analysis of all of the Mets main draft picks, not just their number one. Here at 2 Guys I’m going in a different (ie:easy) way and thought it would be fun to look back at the players who went number 10 overall in the last ten years and see where they are now. So, here we go:

2004, Thomas Diamond, P, Rangers

diamond_rangers_uniform

Thomas major league career consisted of 16 bad appearances with the Chicago Cubs in 2010. As far as my computer can tell he no longer throws a baseball for a living.

2005, Cameron Maybin, OF, Tigers

Cameron Maybin

Maybin was considered a hot prospect and was one of the key players included by the Tigers in their December 2007 trade for a guy named Miquel Cabrera. Although Maybin has been able to bounce around a little and make some major league meal money his inclusion in the Cabrera deal is a good example of selling high on a prospect.

2010 Giants2006, Tim Linecum, P, Giants
2007, Madison Bumgarner, P, Giants

For good measure in 2008, Brian Sabean picked Buster Posey at number 5. Anyone wondering why the Giants were World Series Champs in 2010 and 2012, the 2006-2008 drafts were vital to those efforts.

2008, Jason Castro, C, Astros

Jason Castro

Castro did not hit at first, but blossomed into a power hitting catcher last year at age 26.

2009, Drew Storen, P, Nationals

Drew Storen

A college pitcher, Storen was able to make an impact quickly for the Nationals, he made his debut in 2010. Storen has been a quality reliever for the Nationals since.

2010, Michael Choice, OF, A’s

Michael Choice

Traded by the A’s this offseason he is off to a rough rookie campaign with Texas.

2011, Cory Spangenberg, 2B, Padres

Cory Spangenberg

Spangenberg has done well enough in the Padres system, and is slowly climbing up the ladder (Double A at this point.) He has had two concussions already, which has not helped. George Springer, killing it for Houston right now, was taken next at number 11.

2012, David Dahl, OF, Rockies

david dahl

A high school outfielder when picked, it’s early to say too much. Dahl is currently in the Sally league.

2013, Philip Bickford, P, Blue Jays

Philip Bickford

Bickford, a high school pitcher, did not sign with the Blue Jays and enrolled at Cal-State Fullerton.

 

 

 

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4 comments

  1. Scott McMan says:

    I am in the same boat as it concerns amateurs. Frankly, I’m not that great at rating farm hands either. I was way on board with bringing up Mike Jacobs. I was wrong about him. However, I do think Flores is going to make an impact.

    I’d love to hear an educated estimate on the future of Conforto. We desperately need power.

    • It’s not fair, it’s not right, but I don’t like the Conforto pick. Obviously, he has time to change my mind. From what I’ve read: bad arm, no speed, poor defense, good hitter who WALKS A LOT.

      Myopic Sandy.

      And, I think, yet another misreading of what the Mets need to win at Citi Field. Sandy doesn’t value speed or defense in a big, cavernous park. Oh well. If he hits the crap out of the ball — and that’s worth valuing — it could work. I’m worried that the Mets GM is too obsessed with plate discipline, working deep counts, etc.

  2. Eraff says:

    I’m not sure that anyone was “wrong” about Mike Jacobs. There’s a point where a player needs to make a decision to adjust and become a better player—Jacobs didn’t appear to want to do that. He had a “special ball off the Bat”, but he didn’t Finish the job.

  3. Eraff says:

    Jeff Francoeur, as “another”

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